DayDreaming In Children

We adults are sometimes guilty of daydreaming. But daydreaming is a more common occurrence in children. Habitual daydreaming should be discouraged in young

Day Dream (Explore!)

Day Dream (Explore!) (Photo credit: Loving Earth)

children.

Indulging in daydreaming may eventually shut the child out from reality. Children who daydream excessively are usually lost in their own thoughts that they tend lose their bearings completely. In addition, they become unmindful of the people or things around them.

In extreme cases, a child can cause physical danger to himself and those people around; for example, when he is crossing a street.
In relation to academic performance, the excessive child daydreamer may end up performing very poorly in the classroom.

It is a characteristic of habitual daydreamers to ignore those who speak to him directly and to ignore instructions as well. In time, they become more absent-minded and withdrawn. Certainly, the excessive daydreamer’s inability to respond to others necessarily impacts his social relationships as well.


Teachers have an important role in helping daydreamers. In addition to transferring knowledge to children, their primary role is to create a classroom environment that fosters active participation in children.

They need to adopt active teaching approaches as well. Parents can also provide significant support to help their children.

Causes of Daydreaming

After being aware of the negative effects of excessive of daydreaming to our children, the next important thing to do is for parents and teachers to identify how the daydreaming habit started in their children.

Through this, parents and teachers will have a better understanding regarding the origins of such behaviour and the pertinent treatment.

Basically, children daydream because of their need to “get away” from stressful or unpleasant circumstances at home or at school. Children find it much easier to retreat to a more pleasant and more enjoyable world created by their own fantasies. In daydreaming, children imagine a world where they can freely do what they want to do and have what they desire, even those things that they cannot do or have in the real world.

Indulging in daydreaming may eventually shut the child out from reality. Children who daydream excessively are usually lost in their own thoughts that they tend to lose their bearings completely. In addition, they become unmindful of the people or things around them.

The following are some possible explanations why children resort to daydreaming:

1) Environmental Distractions: Children are easily distracted by actions, noise, music, and people. These are distractions they welcome for these can be very entertaining.

2) Eating Junk food and having Irregular Meals: Usually, children prefer junk food to healthy food. Sometimes, they also do not eat on time. As a result, the stomach discomforts the children, eventually affecting their ability to concentrate; and

3) Medication: Children become inattentive as a result of restlessness due to some medicines.

Many experts on child psychology add other possible reasons for daydreaming:

4) Failure to entice the children in class activities;

5) Failure to capture the interest of the children in the classroom, as a result of constant failure to deliver good performance; and

6) Prolonged and boring lessons, which lead to a high level of fatigue.

Many experts have also found that there is a higher tendency amongst children with autism or Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) to daydream.

Teachers have an important role in helping daydreamers. In addition to transferring knowledge to children, their primary role is to create a classroom environment that fosters active participation in children. They need to adopt active teaching approaches as well. Parents can also provide significant support to help their children.

Tips To Overcome Daydreaming

- Tips for Teachers

1) If possible, initiate a one-on-one talk with the child to find out the source of his daydreaming.

2) Entice the child to participate actively in classroom activities. The teacher can gauge the child’s level of understanding by asking him questions connected with the topic discussed

3) Regularly come up with group work in order for the child to be constantly involved in discussion and activities with his classmates.

4) Use interactive teaching, with the topics related to the children’s everyday lives.

5) Use visual aids in your lectures to boost the interest of the children.

6) Allow interval breaks during class and engage the children in forms of simple activities and exercises.

7) Be well aware of the different kinds of learning disorders in children that can be risk factors for daydreaming, to be able to recommend professional help.

- Tips for Parents

1) Initiate a heart-to-heart talk with your child to find out the source of his daydreaming.

2) Supply the teacher relevant information regarding the child’s daydreaming behaviour to enable her to keep an eye on the child.

3) Have an open mind to professional intervention if the situation worsens.

4) Make certain your child has plenty of rest at home throughout school days.

5) Show positive interest in your child’s schoolwork and be involved in his learning.

6) Keep an eye on your child’s leisure activities. Limit his indulgence in toys, TV, electronic games, etc.

7) Engage your child in conversation regularly so that you will have a better and deeper understanding of his concerns and needs.

Enhanced by Zemanta